Coronavirus round-up Friday 24th April: Two doctors died from coronavirus in Finland

Two doctors in Finland have died after contracting coronavirus, according to a post in an online discussion board of the Finnish Medical Journal Lääkärilehti, by doctors Janne Aaltonen and Eetu Salunen. Zoom
Foto: Lehtikuva/Jussi Nukari

Two doctors in Finland have died after contracting coronavirus, according to a post in an online discussion board of the Finnish Medical Journal Lääkärilehti, by doctors Janne Aaltonen and Eetu Salunen.

Here's our evening round-up of the latest coronavirus news from Finland.
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Here's our evening round-up of the latest coronavirus news from Finland

  • Latest infection numbers and casualties
  • Report: Two doctors died from coronavirus in Finland
  • Prime Minister tests negative for coronavirus
  • Researchers: Epidemic has far reaching effects on society
  • Coronavirus tracking app to be trialed in Vaasa
  • Ministers give briefing for children
 



Latest infection numbers and casualties

The Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare THL says there are now 4,395 confirmed cases of coronavirus in Finland - an increase of 111 from the previous day.

There are also 177 deaths reported - an increase of just five from the day before.

Meanwhile across the country the number of people receiving hospital treatment for coronavirus has fallen back to 199, with 61 patients in intensive care. Those figures have remained fairly stable, with a slight fall, over the course of the last week.

The Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital District released new data about the 100 patients that have so far received treatment for Covid-19 symptoms in intensive care. Nearly half of them have been under 60 years old





Report: Two doctors died from coronavirus in Finland

Two doctors in Finland have died after contracting coronavirus, according to a post in an online discussion board of the Finnish Medical Journal Lääkärilehti, by doctors Janne Aaltonen and Eetu Salunen.

The pair wrote that because of particular risks to men, that medical staff aged over 55 should not be working in conditions that potentially expose them to coronavirus.

"For one reason or another, male doctors seem to be at particularly high risk. We consider it likely that the male sex is an independent risk factor for severe coronavirus infection" Aaltonen and Salunen wrote.

Neither the Ministry of Health nor the Finnish Medical Association Lääkkäriliitto have issued official instructions about male doctors over a certain age not working with Covid patients.






Prime Minister tests negative for coronavirus

Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP) has tested negative for coronavirus. A statement from her office on Friday morning says that she returned to work normally today.

On Thursday it was announced that the PM would self-isolate and work from her official residence after a worker at Kesäranta on Friday had themselves come into contact with another person who was confirmed with Covid-19.

That worker had not met the Prime Minister, the PM's staff nor her family and the self-isolation was a precaution.








Researchers: Epidemic has extensive impact on society

Researchers at the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare THL say the coronavirus epidemic has a far-reaching effect on society, especially our well-being and on health services.

According to the report municipalities have played an unequal role in dealing with the outbreak, with some larger municipalities better able to cope than smaller ones, especially when it comes to managing healthcare.

"If the restrictive measures are continued for the rest of the year, the effects on well-being and the entire national economy will be significant and the recovery will take a long time" says THL Chief Information Officer Pekka Rissanen.

THL says that as some municipal healthcare teams prepared for the virus, they restricted or canceled non-urgent services too early - and that pressure on local healthcare services will inevitably increase after the crisis eases.   







Coronavirus tracking app to be trialed in Vaasa 

A smartphone application that helps healthcare professionals identify people who may have been exposed to coronavirus is being piloted at Vaasa Central Hospital from May.

In the testing phase for the Ketju app, the service is used by a small number of staff at the hospital to simulate possible patients as well as healthcare authorities in a controlled environment.

"Digital identification of those exposed to the coronavirus is important for the future of Finland as a whole and regionally for the Vaasa hospital district. We want to be at the forefront of looking for tools to solve the acute crisis" explains Marina Kinnunen, Director of the Vaasa Hospital District. 

The app has been developed by Finnish companies and funded in part by Sitra.






Ministers give briefing for children

Three government ministers have given a briefing for children on Friday, about the coronavirus epidemic and how it affects their lives.

It's the first time the government has arranged such an event, with the young participants able to use video links to pose their questions directly to Prime Minister Sanna Marin (SDP), Education Minister Li Andersson (Left) and Minister of Science and Culture Hanna Kosonen (Centre).

Among the topics covered were when children could go back to school, how Finland was coping with the coronavirus crisis, and what could children do during the pandemic.

Ministers were able to answer the questions, and remind the children to keep washing their hands and practice social distancing.

 

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Öppna trädgårdar runtom i landet på söndag – i år även hemifrån

I år har privatpersoner också fått välja att filma sina trädgårdar i stället för att öppna dem för besökare.
Foto: Sofie Fogde/SPT

I år har privatpersoner också fått välja att filma sina trädgårdar i stället för att öppna dem för besökare.

Nytt för det nationella evenemanget Öppna trädgårdar är att man i år kan se videoklipp från olika trädgårdar runtom i landet via evenemangets Youtube-kanal.

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